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Photo: Marvin (PA)(Flickr); Licence: CC BY-NC 2.0 

In the first Good Reads of 2016, former editor Frances Jackson shares a few articles that have got her thinking about Europe over the last few days.  Read about contrasting efforts to integrate asylum seekers in Germany and Finland, the publication of a new annotated edition of Mein Kampf, and why the AZERTY keyboard could soon become a thing of the past.

Frances, former Diaphragm / Baby editor

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IN search of a common ground

I suppose it’s inevitable that, in the face such a torrent of depressing news stories and seemingly insurmountable hurdles as is the case with the ongoing refugee crisis, we are drawn to examples of journalism that give us hope for the future. Certainly, I think that is what made Herbi Dreiner’s recent guest post for the Guardian stand out for me.  He is part of a team at the University of Bonn that has started putting on physics shows with Arabic explanations to help engage young asylum seekers who are still finding their feet in Germany.  I love the simplicity of the idea, its optimism and the way it encourages us to find a shared understanding, rather seeking to emphasise differences and deficiencies.

Wednesday, 27 January 2016 11:13

E&M proudly presents….

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…the new editorial board. We are excited to introduce Alex from Bulgaria, Isabell from Germany, Justine from France, Sam from the UK and Victoria from France. With five new editors, our board is now complete and everyone is already eagerly working on the upcoming issue for April. But first, we want you to get to know the new faces at E&M.

May I introduce all
Photo courtesy of Isabell Wutz 
 

Alex is from Bulgaria, but currently living in Poland. He used to be a pseudo intellectual of sorts, but after a recent cathartic about-face, he recently started to work in a multi-national corporation in Poland. Brought up by a pack of wolves, he despises cars everywhere and is complimented for his zany remarks in inappropriate moments. For him, Europe means ever so titillating waves of post-traumatic chill. Alex decided to become part of E&M to push towards more sincerity in discussing present-day Europe. While working as editor for Diaphragm, a glass of good rum always seems to do the trick.

Friday, 01 January 2016 14:30

Happy New Year from E&M!

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Photo: Chris (Flickr); Licence: CC BY 2.0

On behalf of everyone at E&M, we'd like to wish all of our readers and contributors a very happy, healthy and peaceful New Year. Here's hoping 2016 will be a good one for Europe. And don't forget: the new edition of the magazine comes out tomorrow, jam-packed with thought-provoking articles and interviews. Highlights including predictions for the year ahead, a European burger guide and insights into the new political order in Spain. We can't wait to share it with you!

With Euroscepticism on the rise, what can be done to get Europeans to start debates around constructive criticism about Europe?  E&M editor Nicoletta Enria met Paola Buonadonna, director of the Wake Up Europe! campaign run by the Wake Up Foundation for a chat about the challenges of creating a transnational discourse, Brexit and how to create a conversation about together building a Europe we want to see. 

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Photo courtesy of Paola Buonadonna 

E&M: Hello Paola! To begin with can you let us know what the Wake Up Euope! campaign is?

Paola: The whole thrust of the Wake Up Foundation is educational and awareness-raising, the starting point is that there are trends that threaten our way of life that we don’t realize yet. The motion of these tectonic plates is something that we should be aware of now and be talking about now and you know Europe is one part of this.The idea behind Wake Up Europe! is to get people together to start thinking, talking and acting about Europe. It’s an interesting mix, we want to use the Great European Disaster Movie to promote this transnational conversation and this will happen for most of the time online on various channels such as social media. The interesting thing I think about it is that we don’t just want people to download the film and watch it, we want people to organise events so that they can meet face to face with other people and talk about these things. The idea is that it’s the face to face sort of activism of that kind that is slightly missing at the moment. Europe is what the media, politicians , think tanks say and they give you a version of what Europe is about and they interpret and percolate for us how we should look at Europe. Depending on where you live and depending on what’s in the news that can be a very highly skewed or narrow perspective or you’ve got, as my colleague James, calls it, click activism – various petitions websites that send you constant requests for very pointed, limited action. But you sit on your own in your house and you click a button, you are not really connecting in any meaningful way with anybody else. The idea behind this is to use the film to bring people together both physically, face to face, and with an online conversation that continues after they watch the film, we ask them to get back in touch with us, tell us what they thought and tweet throughout with the #WakeUpEurope.

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